The Best James Bond Movies of All Time

Bond fans recently received the disappointing news that No Time To Die’s release date would be pushed back again. The final outing for Daniel Craig as Britain’s most famous spy was due to hit cinema’s a little over 12 months ago but was delayed for commercial reasons. 

 That means fans will have had to wait six years for the next installment of 007’s escapades. The last time there was such a long gap was between the 1989 release of License to Kill and the 1995 release of GoldenEye. 

 For fans that can’t wait for No Time To Die’s belated launch, here are some of the best James Bond movies of all time that you can watch right now. 

 Dr. No

Dr. No marked the first time moviegoers got to see 007 in action. Starring the late Sir Sean Connery as James Bond, it was an immediate hit. In the film, Bond gets sent to Jamaica to look for a missing agent. While searching with the help of Felix, his friend from the CIA, he discovers Dr. No trying to use a radio beam to disrupt a US space launch. 

 The film didn’t just launch the huge James Bond franchise. It also helped to create the secret agent genre. Many other authors have tried to follow in the footsteps of Ian Fleming, though none have been able to create something so iconic. 

 Rather than the stunning Aston Martin DB5 that Bond is most famous for, he actually drives a Sunbeam Alpine Series II in Dr. No. The car is also lacking many of the special features we see in future Bond movies, but it doesn’t stop 007 from showing off his driving skills. 

 In the first-ever chase scene that features 007, Bond evades the pursuing car by squeezing the short Alpine under a strewn crane, forcing the car behind to swerve. The driver loses control, plummeting to a fiery death off the side of a cliff. Bond then gives one of his customary sarcastic quips to the crane driver, saying that he thought “they were on their way to a funeral”. 

 Diamonds Are Forever

Diamonds Are Forever was the sixth and final Bond film that Sean Connery starred in (he did star in a seventh, but it wasn’t in the “Eon Productions” series). In it, 007 is tasked with investigating a diamond smuggling operation.

 Things take an unexpected turn when Bond discovers that the diamonds aren’t intended for the usual diamond-based products like jewellery. Instead, Ernst Stavro Blofeld intends to use them to create a laser weapon that he will use to destroy the US capital. 

 Diamonds Are Forever includes several iconic scenes, including a huge car chase where Bond is forced to drive on two wheels for quite some time, and one where he heads to a casino and meets an opportunistic lady called Plenty O’Toole. There are many reviews online that say 007 plays the popular wheel-based game of roulette, but that’s incorrect. He’s actually seen in a white dinner suit and black tie at a craps table.

 Tomorrow Never Dies

Tomorrow Never Dies was the second Bond film for Pierce Brosnan. It saw him investigate the illegal arms trade in eastern Europe. He later discovers a media baron who wants to “create news” by starting a war between the United Kingdom and China, sinking a British ship and shooting down a Chinese military jet so that the two sides will blame each other. 

 Bond eventually uncovers the plot and, with the help of a Chinese agent, they manage to foil the plan. 

One of the most iconic parts of Tomorrow Never Dies is Bond’s car. While 007 is most famous for his Aston Martins, Q equips him with a BMW 750iL with some special features installed. To prevent attacks, the car can electrify its exterior, administering shocks to anyone who touches it. Bond can also drive it remotely using his mobile phone. He uses this unique feature to help him escape an underground car park in Germany while under heavy fire from a seemingly never-ending stream of bad guys. 

 So there you have it. Until the release of No Time To Die, you’ve got plenty of Bond action to look back on. Keep your head strong. It shouldn’t be long now.

 

The post The Best James Bond Movies of All Time appeared first on GhBase•com™.